Notes from my Favorite Wine-Bar in Helsinki, Latva Bar

What makes a good wine bar? Experiences are of course personal, but to me, three things are important: A wide selection by the glass, knowledgeable staff and the possibility to have a bite of food. Latva Bar in Helsinki ticks all three boxes, and on top of that, it has a nice, cozy (an non-pretentious) atmosphere. The focus is on ecological wines and ingredients, as is trendy right now. The Bar is located south of the center in the residential area of Kaartinkaupunki. As Helsinki is compact, it is only a ten minute walk from the main shopping street, so a perfect spot for an after-shopping drink or late evening hangout.

The wine list has four bubblies by the glass and for good prices I might add: two champagnes (11-13€), a Cremant de Loire (8€) and one Cava (7,5€). The only thing I can criticize is that the selection of champagnes by the glass was the same as it was last summer; Janisson Barandon Brut Tradition NV and Serge Mathieu Brut Prestige NV. Both are good and would satisfy my thirst for bubbly, however, I like variety, thus this was a bit of a disappointment. It would though bother me more if I would be a frequent visitor. I went for the Cava: Funambul Equilibri Natural, a Brut Nature and Reserva from Navarra (Spain). It had a nice mineral freshness and was definitely value for money.

Cozy feel at the bar
Cozy feel at the bar
Always using fresh ingredients
Always using fresh ingredients
Open all summer
Open all summer

Looking at the list of reds and whites there are over ten of both by the glass, from different wine regions (mostly from the “old world” with a mix of some Australia and New Zealand) and all within a reasonable price range of 7 and 11€. This really excites me as you can sit here all evening trying out different wines. Prices by the glass are for 12cl of wine; I am not sure if they would let me try out half glasses instead (will ask next time) as this is something I appreciate very much with serious wine bars.

The bar is not only good for wine. They make wonderful cocktails from mixing beer with ingredients, like Elderflower and berries, and have a wide selection of micro-brewery beers and ciders. You don’t quite find fresh ciders like you do in the Nordic countries (these are not the yeasty English type) so this is definitely worth trying out if you are visiting. For food, they serve small dishes, Sapas (Suomi-Tapas = Finnish tapas) and for a more demanding hunger a burger with beetroot. The small dishes vary daily and are based on what ingredients are in season.

So if in Helsinki and in the mood for wine, head to Latva for a glass. Even the slightly more serious wine geek will not be disappointed!

Lunching at the Promising Restaurant Ask, Helsinki

When it comes to dining at Michelin-starred restaurants, I actually prefer lunch to dinner. It is usually a calmer time to visit and the price of a menu is easily half compared to having an evening meal. Especially when living in London, the starred restaurants had fabulous lunch and pre-/post-theater deals starting from around 20£ for a set three courses. God I miss London! Last week we visited one of the newer restaurants in Helsinki that has been rewarded a star by Guide de Michelin, Restaurant Ask.

The concept of the restaurant is pure ingredients, produced ecologically or bio-dynamically, sourced from local (or as close by as possible) farms and producers. The place reminds me of Volt in Stockholm and the concept is very trendy right now. Almost, but not quite, passé. The wine list has also been thoroughly considered and sourced from small and medium-sized producers. The champagne list is to die for (Selosse, Doquet Tarlant, Veuve Forny etc) and the selection of reds and whites interesting, however, only from the “old-world”. Next time, I will make sure to come with a bigger group so that we can order by the bottle.

The lunch menu was simple: four courses selected by the chef. There was a possibility for a drinks pairing, however we came to the conclusion that it was too early for too much wine and decided to just pick and choose a few glasses: an aperitif and a glass with the food. The bubbly by the glass was Veuve Forny & Fils Blanc de Blancs served from a magnum bottle. I really like Veuve Forny and think it is a good value for money champagne, however, the blanc de blancs fell a bit short, and at 17€ a glass it was not really worth it. I was happy though that it was served from a Lehman glass. I have been meaning to try those out.

The food was absolutely beautiful, and tasty of course. We had Tagates and greens for a starter, a white fish for seconds (M had some new potatoes and egg as he is not the one for seafood), ox and roots for the main course and a sweet strawberries with elderflower shaved ice. On top of that we had home baked bread with yummy butter, root chips with a yogurt dip, and as palate cleanser, spruce sorbet. The food was very well made and we enjoyed every bite. I paired the food with a Portuguese, dry Vinho Verde (green wine) and M with a local micro-brewery beer. Both tasted wonderful with the fresh ingredients. To finish the meal, Ask had coffee prepared with a Chemex! This is a big plus as it is not many restaurants that cater to the coffee-curious. We have never really understood why quality coffee is so widely neglected at great restaurants. It is, after all, the last “course” on the menu and the last memory of the meal. Ask’s selection of coffees was from Johan & Nyström. Good, but nothing exciting, so we passed and headed somewhere else for our coffees. However, I really appreciated that Ask had thought about this.

All in all the experience was very positive. Not outstanding, but I get it why Ask received it’s star. Service was very friendly. Not as knowledgeable (wine-wise) as I think it “should” have been, but really the waiter was very sweet and sought answers to all of our questions (even the stupid ones). The price for the four course lunch was 49€, so I would say it was ok, but not cheap. The drinks pairing was priced at 41€ (I expect it contained 3-4 drinks). But as we just took individual glasses, the restaurant charged us 10€ per drink. This, I feel was way better value than the champagne aperitif.

Dear Ask, I will definitely visit again. And next time, I will bring some friends and raid your wine-list. Looking forward to seeing what you have in store for us next time!

Sumerian coffee, popular expat cafe in Shanghai with decent coffee

Normally there is a Coffee Monday post but due to a bit summer slacking this ended up being a Coffee Tuesday post. Among the more popular coffee places in Shanghai, is also the usually packed Sumerian coffee. It does not look like much from the outside but the crowd makes one interested to see what it is all about. Somehow it is still usually possible to find a seat, especially along the counter at the windows. There a few coffees to select from as hand brews, either cold or hot as well as espresso based beverages. The coffees are roasted by themselves but it is fairly dark and not dosed properly. It comes out way too dark and the flavors are rather muddled and not very clear. The cappuccino was decent, clearly drinkable, but nothing special. The quality of the coffee sort of falls into the category of being better than a regular cafe but not at all good enough to be a specialist coffee place.

   
 The service was neither friendly nor unfriendly but rather stressed and not really interested in chatting, perhaps due to the number of people there. The tables are placed really close to each other so also very difficult to move around inside as the place is not really inviting to sit for a long time. Three is still free wifi so that is of course a plus. The ambiance is however still not inviting, somehow the feeling of the place was not friendly and all visits there have been loud expats there so not really the atmosphere I am looking for.

   
 The food seems to be a big draw here, a lot of wraps and sandwiches to select from as well as smoothies and salads. Not very local fare, rather more the type of stuff one would find in an average Western cafe. There are better options in the same area (I would hold Seesaw, Cafe del Volcan and Paloma Cafe higher) so will not frequent this place but if in the area I know thatthe coffee is drinkable.

So how does it rate:
Coffee quality: 2
Ambiance and service: 2
Food: 3.5
Vs local competition: 3.5

Wineweek 34: Hello Helsinki!

It is mid July, the temperature is +15 C and it’s raining cats and dogs. I just came back from a Sunday walk, soaking wet. Despite the weather, it is great to be home. Helsinki quiets down in the summer, all Finns either travel somewhere warmer, migrate to their summer cottages or spend time at Finland’s many summer festivals. Last weekend was the legendary Ruis Rock in Turku and I think Pori Jazz just kicked off. I always feel too old for these festivals (too many drunken teenagers), but then again I miss the festive atmosphere. One thing is for sure though, I would not be able to find any good wine.

One could say that the town is sleepy, but to me that is just good news. We have been walking the empty streets, talking about what it would be like to live here after London and Stockholm, and playing around with the idea of moving our businesses here. One thing is for sure, it would mean more paperwork! I don’t know if I could take it, haha! The holiday season also means that nice restaurants (the ones that are open) have space and my favorite wine-bars are not packed full on people. This weekend, we visited four great places, Vinvin and it’s new sibling Bier Bier, Latva Bar and the fabulous Restaurant Ask, that is one of the most recent addition to Helsinki’s collection of Michelin-stars.

As it is summer, and I am actually quite busy with my “secret” project, I will be saving the comments to the actual reviews, however here is a gallery of photos taken with my trusted Samsung Galaxy S6 (the camera is so much better than on the iPhone 6) from this weeks activities:

Veuve Forny & Fils Blanc de Blancs aperitif at Restaurant Ask
Veuve Forny & Fils Blanc de Blancs aperitif at Restaurant Ask
The food was beautiful and yummy at Ask
The food was beautiful and yummy at Ask
Taps Tasting at Bier Bier (12,50€ for 5 x 1dl tasters)
Taps Tasting at Bier Bier (12,50€ for 5 x 1dl tasters)
The Cava at Latva Bar was excellent value for money
The Cava at Latva Bar was excellent value for money
Some red wine to accompany the Cava at Latva Bar
Some red wine to accompany the Cava at Latva Bar
Hanging around in piggy-slippers.. stylish!
Hanging around in piggy-slippers.. stylish!

Thanks for reading! Hoping a great coming week to you all!

Foody Delights In the Heart of Stockholm, Högtorgshallen

I have always been a fan of food markets. Browsing around food stalls, snacking on tasters and sitting down for a cup of “market-coffee” is wonderfully brainless and relaxing, not to mention quite Finnish (especially the “market-coffee” part). The food I decide to pick up also sets the mood for the evenings wine-activities.

Högtorgshallen is one of my absolute favorite food markets in Stockholm. It is not the cheapest, as it is right smack in the center, but it has a good selection of foods, as well as nice restaurants to satisfy mid-shopping snack-attacks. This place might get a bit touristy in the day, but if you head there early in the morning, you can browse in peace. Here are a few tips for restaurants and stalls, and an abundance of photos to get your tummy growling.

1. One of the best cafes in town in located on the street level in Högtorgshallen. Espresso House is a Swedish chain serving decent coffee and cafe food (you can rest assured to get at least an ok brew from every branch). A chain is always tricky because you do not have the same coffee-talent at each location, however this one is special; they have a brew-bar and the talented baristas make hand/brewed coffees from Solberg & Hansen single-origin beans. They don’t serve much food, but you can just pop into the Gateau bakery next door to get some pastries or hand made sandwiches to have at the cafe.

Morning coffees at Espresso House
Morning coffees at Espresso House
Some cheese from Saluplats Husmans
Some cheese from Saluplats Husmans

2. Tokyo Diner is one of my favorite spots for lunch in the city center. They do sushi and also some warm dishes, like Yakitori, steamed cod and the best pulled pork tacos in town (Asian inspired of course). No reservations required, just walk in and enjoy watching the market come to life around you.

3. Saluplats Husman is a cheese stall downstairs. They have a nice selection of french cheeses, like Gryerge and Comte and some wonderful Brilliant-Savarin (adult Philadelphia). There are always some tasters on the counter to get you into the mood for cheese-shopping and the staff are very friendly and knowledgeable (even though this is one of the most touristic markets in town). I do prefer shopping for cheese at Wijnjas Cheese Garage in Kungsholmen though. Their quality is equal and prices 30% lower. However it requires some effort to get there, so if in town, I pick up my cheeses here.

Some charcuterie is a lovely pairing with sparkling wine
Some charcuterie is a lovely pairing with sparkling wine
Pick up a bottle for the evening from Systembolaget
Pick up a bottle for the evening from Systembolaget
Finnish delicacies make me think of home
Finnish delicacies make me think of home

These tips were just scratching the surface of the selection at Högtorghallen. There are also several meat stalls, fish restaurants, Taylor & Jones gourmet sausages and a Finnish shop, with all the classics from a Finnish food market (not the touristy crap, but the real deal). You can pop in for wine shopping in Systembolaget (on the bottom floor), and outside on the square you can buy fruit and vegetables, berries (in the summer) and flowers. I also spotted they have a terrace on the roof for having summer drinks outside. Everything is here for a perfect Saturday pre-wine shopping spree.

Learning French: Wine Vocabulary for Dummies

The journey to the world of wine is not a short one. It takes time to understand the general surroundings of growing and producing wine and to get acquainted with industry terms.  I must admit that I am still barely off the starting line. I have started from sparkling wine, mainly from two or three areas as well as scratched the surface on ports. There will always be more countries, grape varieties, styles of wines or vintages. There will always be more something.

One thing that I have however taken the time to learn are some general terms that you come across on the label of bottles. Words like Appellation, Solera and Cru are thrown around lightly in the world of wine, but I must admit, it was only after I started in the business that I really understood their meaning and implications. Today, even if I am not familiar with the producer, grape or area, I have a general vocabulary to carry out a conversation and/or read the label of a wine bottle. Many of the terms come from the French language, thus the playful subject, Learning French. Here are some of the most useful terms (to my opinion) when buying or discussing wine:

1. The term Cuvée has several meanings, but is mostly related to a blend, either of more than one grape or of wine from specially selected barrels. Simply, it is the blend. When it comes to Champagne, the term can also refer to the first-pressed (and best) juice from the grapes. “Cuvée” is also used to imply prestige or quality, though the term is not officially regulated, and therefore can appear on the labels of all kinds of wines.

2. Cru refers to a vineyard or group of vineyards, especially one of recognized quality. It’s often used within different classifications of French wines. The terms Premier Cru ( used eg. in Burgundy, Saint-Emilion and Bordeaux) and Grand Cru (used eg. in Burgundy, Alsace and Champagne), are generally translated into English as First Growth and Great Growth. The terms designate levels of presumed quality that are variously defined in different wine regions. The terms are not technically a classification of wine quality per se, but are intended to indicate the potential of the vineyard or terroir.

3. The direct translation for the term Vielles Vignes is ‘old vines’. The terms is commonly used on wine labels to indicate that a wine is the product of vines that are particularly old. The practice of displaying it stems from the general belief that older vines, when properly cared for, will produce a better wine. This term, as many others is not clearly regulated, so it is relative what one considers to be ‘old’. We have some great wines from ‘old vine’ in our selection and there the age tends to be from 50 to a 100 years (and yes, the wines are really good).

4. You might have noticed I use the word terroir quite often when I describe the characteristics of a wine. When describing a wine, terroir meand the set of special characteristics brought by the geography (for example altitude), geology (soil) and climate of a certain place.

Appellation Vouvray Controllée
Appellation Vouvray Controllée
5. An appellation is a legally defined and protected geographical indication used to identify where the grapes and wine were grown.  Appellations have restrictions such as geographical boundaries, what grapes may be grown, maximum grape yields, alcohol level, and other quality factors. These requirements for the production must be met before the grower may legally use an appellation name on a wine bottle label. The rules that govern appellations are dependent on the country in which the wine was produced. So if you are generally interested in natural wines (bio-dynamical production, use of pesticides etc.), check out the rules for different appellations. You will find that some are much stricter than others, and though a wine might not be classified as ecological, the appellation may already forbid many practices that are rough on the land. Denominación de Origen Cava is one good example of an appellation with restrictions that push towards a kind treatment of the environment.

For more terms, you can check out the Wine Enthusiasts Glossary for Wine. If you are pondering about a term, don’t be ashamed to ask (or just quickly pop into the loo and google it). Wine people might not always realize they sound a bit silly when flaunting these words like they are a part of everyone’s vocabulary .

Cafe del Volcan: Still going strong on Shanghai’s specialty coffee scene

Among the first on the specialty coffee scene in Shanghai were Cafe del Volcan. They are still going strong and while the cafe is tiny they have a large business selling the roasted beans to other cafes and businesses. The cafe has only a few seats indoors and two tables outside so in total it can seat around 10 people. There is a large selection of different coffee beans to choose from and there is a choice of having it either hot or cold. Of course there is also the option of espresso based beverages.

The coffee quality here is in general high but not reaching the top international quality level. As in most places I have tried in Shanghai the roast is slightly to dark and while the quality is good they are still clearly not among the top ones in the world (in my world I am then talking of the likes of Heart, Tim Wendelboe, Roots and perhaps JB) but still doing an admirable job. The Kenyan filter was excellent, especially iced but the Guatemalan and Ethiopian ones were good but not top notch. What I found very interesting was that they seem very adapt at making the coffee taste great with the beans they have. I did buy some beans with me and I did not come anywhere near producing the same results as they did – when I made it at home it was not good at all. It may of course have something to do with my skills but in general I am fairly good at making coffee and I tried it as Aeropress, Chemex, V60, Gold Filter, Clever and on a regular Mocca Master and while it came out decent with some methods it was still not as good as the cup I had at the cafe. So the staff are perhaps better than the quality of the beans.


Food is non existent but there are a few cookies on sale but for those hungry this is not the place. The service was as I have almost come to expect in Shanghai specialty coffee places excellent and very friendly. They made sure we got proper information on the coffees, were happy to chat and also made sure that we knew that they were cleaning the espresso machine on arrival so it would 5-10 minutes before they could make espresso based beverages. They also offer free wifi but since the place is small it is not inviting to stay for too long.

So how does it rate:
Coffee quality: 3.5
Ambiance and service: 3.5
Food: 1
Vs local competition: 5

Wineweek 33: It’s Getting Hot in Here

As per tradition, I will start with the weather report. It might seem like an irrelevant part of my weekly posts. But on the contrary, I think it is an important note for setting the right mood. The kind of wine I drink is heavily influenced by the weather. So it is no coincidence I have been drinking a lot of light reds, white and rose this week as it has been HOT. Sweden has been showing it’s best with 25-30 C and sun, and I have been doing my best to enjoy the hot weather with some cooling drinks.

Wednesday we went to check out the second location of our favorite wine bar in town, Gaston at Nordiska Kompaniet. NK is one of the finest department stores in town and the top floor has recently been taken over by the king of Swedish fine dining, Björn Franzen. Gaston wine-bar is also a part of Frantzen’s culinary empire and one of the most notable wine-hangouts in town. While the location in the old town of Stockholm remains my favorite (it also has a more extensive list of wine), the NK location is also a place worth to visit. The style of displaying the wines in fridges along the wall with pricing written with a white marker reminds me of Paris and it’s many wonderful wine bars. So on a rainy day, head up to this comfortable oasis for wine in between shopping. The two go well together (I have experience)!

Relaxing at Gaston Wine Bar at Nordiska Kompaniet
Relaxing at Gaston Wine Bar at Nordiska Kompaniet
The beautiful bar at Loka Izakaya
The beautiful bar at Lokal Izakaya
Strawberry, champagne and black pepper. Omnom!
Strawberry, champagne and black pepper. Omnom!

On Friday we went out for some drinks and Asian food at a new restaurant in town, Lokal Izakaya. The Japanese inspired Izakayas are the new food trend in town. Sushi and Asian inspired dishes combined with some yummy cocktails and a list of Sake makes up for a concept I very much enjoy. Sadly every single Izakaya in Stockholm has the same problem, they are not Izakayas. Don’t get me wrong, I like the restaurants as such. I just don’t like that the concept has been so grossly miss-interpreted. An Izakaya is a simple Japanese eatery, like a tavern or pub, a kind of after work place that serves some food to accompany the drinks. The so called Izakayas in Stockholm remind me more of Asian fine dining than a local.  Lokal Izakaya, like the first on the izakaya scene in Stockholm, Shibumi, is a fun restaurant. The cocktails, sashimi, and hot dishes all very satisfying. I was just expecting something more simple.

As many cities in Europe, Stockholm will partly close for summer vacations. July is prime time for Swedes to head to their cottages and travel around in Europe, so many small restaurants and bars close their doors. We went to enjoy the last opening day of Hornstulls Bodega, a wine bar and restaurant close by to where we live. After Gaston, I would say this is THE place to come for wine. We enjoyed some Spätburgunder rose, reds from Loire and an amazing peppery Rioja.

Last wine of the summer at Hornstulls Bodega
Last wine of the summer at Hornstulls Bodega
Celebrating 4th of July at Nya Carnegiebryggeriet
Celebrating 4th of July at Nya Carnegiebryggeriet

I will miss the Bodega, but the summer will go by fast. Next week we are heading for Helsinki, my home city; to rest, meet friends and relatives, and to drink some more wine of course. The blog will not be taking a holiday, but summer vacation will mean that there will be a slightly slower pace (maybe). And perhaps I have the chance to finally really consider what to do with the look and layout. All ideas and inspiration are more than welcome! Hope a warm and sunny week to you all!

Wine Review: Quinta da Pellada Primus 2012

In the start of our journey towards being a reputable wine merchant, M and I made a product strategy. We would have wines in our selection that A. we liked to drink ourselves (who else would empty all the leftover stock) and B. would be affordable to a large group of people. Due to the high costs of logistics and taxes, we will never be a cheap shop, but we will offer wines from a reasonable (to our opinion) price range of 100-300 SEK a bottle. So Primus, though it was said to be excellent, was not on the initial list.

However, that was before we actually had the chance to enjoy a full bottle with some winecurious friends. The Primus is something unique and something that I would almost invest a small fortune in, and let me tell you why:

Alvaro Castro the winemaker at Quinta da Pellada has drawn a lot of his inspiration from Cardoso de Vilhena, who for a long time was the head enologist at the Centro de Estudos Vitivinícolas de Nelas (CEN) in the Dão region. Alvaro claims to have learned almost everything from him and the 1964 white wine from Vilhena is the finest wine Alvaro ever tasted. Primus is his attempt to copy that wine.

The wine is an old field blend from a wide range of grapes handpicked from 65 year old vines that have grown on granite soils. The wine has been slowly fermented in oak barrels for two months and then an additional 3 months in old oak barrels being stirred on the lees. Before it is relaesed it spends two years in the bottle.

The blend includes a variety of grapes among them, Cercial, Bical, Verdelho, Málvasia, Terrantez, Cachorrinho, Douradinha and many more. The main grape is, however, called  Encruzado, which is undoubtedly the finest white grape variety in Portugal. It is grown maily in the granite hills of Dao in the center of the country and makes rich, full-bodies wines with aromas of lemon, woody herbs and melon (mmm).

Primus white from Quite de Pellada
Primus white from Quite de Pellada
The Primus is a rich wine with notes of melon and floral overtones. The taste is slightly oxidized, but in a fresh way, and has hints of dried tropical fruit, like pineapple, pleasant citrus and nice acidity. The mouth feel is full and slightly waxy making Primus an excellent partner with white meats (we ate lightly marinated chicken). Especially M is often not a huge fan of white wines, but the Primus and Encruzado-wines in general are amongst his favorites. This is a wine that will age well up to five or ten years if one can just be patient enough not to drink it.

And coming to the price, we are talking about an average of 35-45€ depending on the year. The quality is a 4.5, but what is the value for money? The price is a bit over my limit for what I have been prepared to pay for white wines before. But what I can see happening is an epiphany. A striking realization that I have not dug in deep enough with white wines to state a roof price. This already happened with bubblies three years back, when I stepped over my 20€ limit and started sinking in to the world of champagnes (and premium cava). Perhaps it is time for me to take that step with white wines.

What do you say? What would be your limit for prices on white wine, and do you believe that a pearl like the Primus would be interesting to the wider public? In Sweden, the price would climb from the levels of Portugal and I doubt we would be able to sell it (if we actually want to make some profit) for less than 400 SEK a bottle. Would you buy six bottles if you would really like it? Help me out! No, help Primus out! And let me know if this wine should make it to the Winecurious selection.

Legendary Burgers at Oljebaren

Stockholm is the city of food trends and there is nothing more trendy than a good burger. To be honest, getting hyped about a burger is a bit passé, but I don’t believe it will ever really go out of fashion. If you want to get a yummy burger in Stockholm, there are several good places, Oljebaren being one of the traditional ones. This gastro pub will however close it’s doors in November, so you should hurry to have a bite before it is too late.

Oljebaren is located in the heart of Vasastan close to the St. Eriksplan station. The front of the bar does not demand much attention, but when peaking in it invites to stay. The restaurant has a spacious ground floor (cramped with tables) and a small upstairs. There is a long bar with seating, so one can also enjoy a dinner with a view over the action. Even on a Monday the bar was fully packed with people. The ambiance is cozy and gives a home-kitchen kind of feel. We were a party of three with a pushchair and the staff really made a great effort to cramp up in with all of our bearings. I must say the helpful attitude made a good impression on me.

I can see familiar bottles on the wall
I can see familiar bottles on the wall

The wine list was actually quite interesting, even though I would have assumed that this is more of a beer place. They had a cava by the glass, Pere Ventura Primer Brut Reserva, for 85 SEK. This was a very pleasant surprise as Pere Ventura is the brother of Oscar and Xavier Ventura, whom are behind the Llagrima d’Or and Peret Fuster cavas that we sell (they have quite a large family). The taste was fresh with green apple, citrus and orange blossoms. Good value for money I would say. The other bubbly by the glass was the Drappier Carte d’Or for 99 SEK. I really like the style of the house of Drappier so this is, to my opinion, a steal for champagne in Stockholm.

The burger in all it's glory
The burger in all it’s glory

The burger was, well, fantastic! The beef was perfectly medium rare, the home-baked bread soft and all other fillings (like the sauce and Gryerge-cheese) fresh and of high quality. The burger came with lovely sides of crunchy fries and fresh coleslaw. No party tricks or glamour, just an honest traditional burger. As a companion to the burger we ordered beer. The list was good as is normal in Stockholm (the Swedes like their Micro-brewery beer) and we ended up ordering some Dugges Saison and Brew Dog IPA’s. It is a shame this place will close, but luckily there are many other burger places in town. I however recommend to visit while you still have the chance.