Wineweek 120: The Return of the Home Mixologist

We are well on our way past February. Only one week left. In March I can officially start hoping for an early spring. The weather forecast doesn’t seem to agree with me, as Tuesday will bring a new fresh coat of snow. Lets hope that whatever winter is coming, it will be a short one. The benefit with this time of the year though is that it is the season for warming up with hot drinks and eating pastries. Continue reading “Wineweek 120: The Return of the Home Mixologist”

Grape Love: Pinot Noir

When people ask me which is my favorite grape, I hesitate saying Pinot Noir. It might be because of Sideways. I don’t really want to be mistaken with getting my wine inspiration from a movie; although in reality I don’t really care. I love light red wines with subtle herbal and mineral flavors, and I love full blanc de noirs champagnes. I love French Pinot from Bourgogne with some age and complexity in them, and I love fresh young and slightly salty Pinot from the US west coast. A Pinot seldom lets me down, although it is often quite pricey. However, there are some good exceptions: German Spätburgunders (late harvested Pinot) are on the rise and very good value for money. The price represents the effort that goes into growing Pinot, so I thought I would do a dip into the basics.  Continue reading “Grape Love: Pinot Noir”

Wineweek 110: Return to Matkonsulatet

There is nothing like finding a great new winebar. I guess when you live in one place long enough, you stop looking for new spots proactively. Or at least I get a bit lazy. We stumbled on Carotte almost accidentially. Well, not exactly, but the visit was mostly unplanned: Googled with an aim to find a spot for a glass in between our house and Matkonsulatet, the prime destination of Saturday night. Continue reading “Wineweek 110: Return to Matkonsulatet”

My Three Favorite Wines of July

July is the hottest month of the year for us in the Nordics. To be honest its seldom actually hot.We are lucky if we hit 25C. Regardless of the mild weather, the summer has an effect on my diet. And now I don’t mean just food, but wine as well. I like my wines light in July. Ok, so I like my wines always quite light. However, I could not gulp down any heavy Barolo or Cabernet in this weather. Those I reserve solely for cold fall or Christmas evenings when I actually feel like something thicker. As I have tasted some great new stuff this July, I thought I would share with you my favorite new discoveries.  Continue reading “My Three Favorite Wines of July”

Wineweek 88: Summer in the City

It is the peak of the summer here in Stockholm. Sun has been shining almost all week and traffic is slow. Perfect. There have just been two things hindering us from sitting outside and enjoying a lot of wine: the flu (of course it comes when you relax a bit) and a curse called Pokemon Go. M has become obsessed with it, and of course spread the addiction to me as well. It is so funny to observe how other people are so hung on it as well. I notice many adults like us walking completely transfixed, heads bent over their phones, hunting for Pokemon. There were also a huge number of people (adults) sitting at a kids playground fiddling with their mobiles because there was a Pokestop there. I suspect many of them did not have their child with them. If you don’t understand what I am talking about, good! You are lucky. Do not download the game.  Continue reading “Wineweek 88: Summer in the City”

Perhaps the Best Pinot in the World?

Situated in the Chehalem Mountains (Wilamette, Oregon) at an elevation between 400 and 500 lies Vidon Vineyards. There, physicist, farmed and winemaker, Don Hagge grows and crafts perhaps the best pinot in the world. At least the best that I have ever tasted. VIDON produces 7 wine varieties and uses 100% own grapes.  Although the emphasis is on 5 clones of Pinot noir, the Hagge family have small blocks of Chardonnay, Pinot gris, Pinot blanc, Viognier, Tempranillo and Syrah. The winery is LIVE certified sustainable vineyard and winery. Don believes in minimal intervention in the winemaking process ( a little bit like Anselme Selosse). And the best part is, we are discussing with Don to bring his wines to Sweden and Denmark. So exciting! Continue reading “Perhaps the Best Pinot in the World?”

The Secrets of Bollinger

I have been aching to write about my visit to Bollinger since I closed the heavy iron gates behind me. The visit to the legendary champagne house was by far the best of the whole trip to Champagne. Bollinger is not easy to gain access to (not as hard as Krug though), but we were able to book a special tour through the Swedish importer. Continue reading “The Secrets of Bollinger”

Wine Review: Mr P Knows Pinot Noir

I confess. We bought the bottle because of the label. It was stylish and moderately funny (we giggled about the name. I know, childish). That is what caught our attention in the first place. Then there is of course the aspect that Pinot Noir is not that commonly grown in South Africa. We had something “professional” to place the purchase decision on. But yeah, it was the label. Successful marketing from IONA Vineyards, a family venture in Elgin, close to Cape Town.     Continue reading “Wine Review: Mr P Knows Pinot Noir”

Wineweek 67: Chilling with Sparkling Sauvignon Blanc

Do you ever feel like the gone week feels really short and long at the same time? It feels like I was writing Wineweek 66 just yesterday, but in between I have had the chance to work, travel to Copenhagen and Oslo (sorry no wine this time), read up on rose and white Burgundy and spend the weekend on the terms of a seven year old (my goddaughter). We went to a kids theme park, overdosed on cake and crappy burgers and spent an agonizing hour at the Disney Store. It was all great fun (except for the Disney store), and we even had some nice wine moments together with M and her mother. However, this weeks Wineweek will be very short (mainly due to me being completely exhausted). Enjoy the pictures!

Continue reading “Wineweek 67: Chilling with Sparkling Sauvignon Blanc”

Wine Review: Mumm (de Verzenay) Blanc de Noirs

We recently visited Mumm when in Reims and in addition to a small tour of their facility we also sampled their Blanc de Blancs and the Blanc de Noirs. Having previously reviewed the Blanc de Blancs it is also appropriate to the same with the Blanc de Noirs. I will not reiterate the story of Mumm so check the previous review for that.

The Blanc de Noirs is however much more what I would have expected from Mumm as their own production of grapes is heavy on Pinot. This specific cuvee is however not any Pinot Noir, it is made entirely from Pinot Noir from the Grand Cru village of Verzenay. The vineyard is on the north facing slopes of Montagne de Reims. It is one of the more exclusive cuvees from Mumm so quantities are somewhat limited. It spends 6 years ageing in Mumm’s cellars.

Pouring the Blanc de Noirs
Pouring the Blanc de Noirs

Having been very positively surprised by the Blanc de Blancs I had high expectations on this on as well and perhaps that was part of the issue. The first look showed a intense gold color and especially side by side with the Blanc de Blancs it was significantly darker.
The nose was powerful with nougat, dried fruit mixed with hints of coffee and vanilla. On the palate there was a mix of yellow fruits, honey, brioche and the nougat from the nose also is present here.

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The flavors are not at all unpleasant but for me it was still a bit disappointing as it did not at all match the quality of the Blanc de Blancs. This was more power and less subtle and complex flavors. I suspect it would need some food alongside it to be at its best and I could imagine it with some stronger cheese or some salty food.

It is selling for around €60 in many parts of Europe and looking at that price I do not see it as good value for money as there are many better champagnes at lower prices. So how does it rate:
Quality: 3.5
Value for money: 2.5